#ModelLife! // DIY Bone Broth

DIYBONEBROTHCOVER

At my annual LA Friends Thanksgiving a few weeks ago, one of my friends gently shamed me for wanting to throw out all the bones from our delicious turkey. “You can make bone broth out of them!” she said. What? How would I go about doing that, and why do I want to do it? Also, isn’t that gross?

If you are a New Yorker, standing in line of trendy Brodo restaurant, waiting for your to-go cup of bone broth – you already know what all the hype is about. If you’re just hearing about bone broth for the first time, like me, let me tell you why this magic sustenance will be your favorite go-to brew.

Bone broth is made by slowly cooking bones with small amounts of meat, vegetables and aromatics in a large batch of water. It is similar to stock, but is made over a longer period of time (sometimes upwards of 24 hours), thus allowing the natural ingredients from bones – electrolyte minerals, amino acids, gelatin, collagen, and bone marrow, to leech into the broth.

The first records of bone broth being used, come from the 12th century, when Egyptian physicians prescribed it as a remedy from colds and asthma. Bone broth is easily digested, and when made from organic chicken, contains natural antibiotics. Ever wonder why you crave chicken soup when you’re sick?!

It has been shown that consuming a cup of bone broth a day helps reduce inflammation of stomach lining, thus is a great option for when your tummy is feeling under the weather. On top of that, the readily-available nutrients and amino acids in the broth strengthen your immune system and nourish the body. Many people claim that consuming bone broth on a daily basis helps with allergies and autoimmune diseases. And you did hear that I said bone broth contains gelatin and collagen, right? That means stronger hair and better, more elastic skin, as well as stronger nails and teeth.

I have made bone broth from both the left over turkey bones and from organic beef bones that I bought at my local Whole Foods (who knew they sold those?!). I make sure to get organic, free range chicken, turkey or beef. Everything from the bones gets cooked into your broth, so you want to make sure you are eating a healthy animal. I was afraid the broth would taste a little funky, but I have to say using bones from an already cooked or roasted meat makes for a great taste. If you get raw bones from Whole Foods or your butcher, roast them in the oven at 350F for 30 minutes before putting them in the broth. I prefer making the broth in a slow cooker. That way it can be left alone to do it’s thing, and I don’t have to use my gas stove.

BONE BROTH RECIPE:

2 pounds bones, gizzards, skin
1 onion roughly chopped
3 carrots roughly chopped
2 stalks of celery roughly chopped
1.5 Tbs apple cider vinegar
2 cloves of garlic, smashed
1 bunch of Italian parsley (add during the last 30 minutes of cooking)
1 Tsp whole peppercorns
2 Bay leaves
Salt to taste after the broth is finished.

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1. Cover the bones and gizzards with water. I use a 5-quart slow cooker, so that’s about 4.5 quarts of water.
2. Add apple cider vinegar, and let sit for 30 minutes. This draws the nutrients out of the bones.
3. Cook on high for about 2 hours, periodically removing the impurities that rise up to the top. When the broth is brought to a boil, change settings to Low, take the gizzards and skin out of the broth. Remove the bones, taking the meat off them, then return them to the pot. Add onion, carrots, celery, peppercorns, bay leaf and garlic, cook on low for 22-24 hours.
4. 30 minutes before finish time, add the parsley to the broth. This adds an extra kick of nutrients to the broth.
5. Strain the broth over a metal mesh strainer, discarding the bones and vegetables. You can add some more salt to taste at this point. Let the broth cool to room temperature. By that time, there should be a layer of fat at the top. Skim the layer off for a fat-free bone broth! Now store in the fridge for up to 6 days, or freeze for later use.

If made correctly, the broth will become gelatinous while in the fridge. I like to drink the broth hot from a cup, with a dash of turmeric. Turmeric is another anti-inflammatory agent, that’s supposed to be fabulous for your health. So far, I have found the broth to be quite filling, I have it as an in between meals snack sometimes. And my agency did say that my skin looked really good. So, what are you waiting for? Go try it!!

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